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Type the value you wish to convert into the box and then click on the desired conversion button. The result will replace the original value in the box.

Some handy information on weights, measures and conversion.

Weights and Measures

 

The importance of Weights and Measures in Cooking

Correct weighing or measuring of ingredients is necessary in getting the correct result from a recipe. This rule is especially true when backing, making large quantities or for commercial use.

Although Weighing ingredients is the most accurate method, most recipes are not written this way and you also requires a good quality scale that can measure accurately to at least a gram or less. The most common scales are the balance and the digital scale. They come in a varieties of designs and accuracies, Digital scales are probably the best  buy and can often weigh very small amounts accurately. However with most scales the better the accuracy the more it is going to cost.

Measurement of ingredients is how most recipes are written and may seem easier than weighing but not as accurate.

Often ingredients are in such small quantities that a scale may not work, yet a standard measure will. The weighing of liquids is also difficult, however they can easily be measured with cups in cc, ml, l, cups or numerous other standard measures.  

Standard equipment should be used for measuring liquids and solids.

Equipment for Measuring Liquids and Solids

A standard liquid cup is of 8 oz. or 250 ml of capacity. It may be subdivided (graduated) and marked for measuring ¼ ,½ ,¾ ,1/3 and 2/3 of a cup or graduated by 10,25,50 or 100 mls.

For measuring dry ingredients, it is better to use fractional cups rather than a single full cup measure. With a single graduated cup measure it is difficult to get a partial measure accurately.  

A set of measuring spoons can measure 1 teaspoon, 1/2 teaspoon, 1/4 teaspoon and 1 tablespoon or 1 ml, 2 ml, 5 ml, 15 ml, 20 and sometimes 30 ml.

How to Measure Liquids

Use a clear or see through measuring cup that can measure above the required amount.

Place the measuring cup on a flat surface.

Fill to the measure you need.

Dry Ingredients

Sift dry ingredient before measuring them. Fill a measuring cup lightly with dry ingredient using a tablespoon, until it is heaped full. Do not shake or tap the cup while it is being filled. When heaped, level the dry ingredient in the cup with the straight edge of the knife. Use a smaller fractional cup for measuring less than one cup.

For measuring spoons, fill the measuring spoon to heaping full by dipping it in the dry ingredient and then level with the straight edge of a knife. Measure half spoon can be done by cutting a full spoon in half lengthwise and scraping out one half. Measure quarter spoon by cutting half spoon crosswise into portions as nearly equal as possible and scraping out a quarter.

For Solids (Butter, margarine, lards, shortenings etc.)

Press the ingredient into the appropriate measuring cup so that air spaces are forced out.

Level the ingredient with the straight edge of a knife when the cup is full.

Conversions

Flour (all-purpose) - 1 Cup = 100g = 4oz
Rice (raw) - 1Cup = 225g = 8oz
Sugar (Granulated) - 1Cup = 225g = 8oz

 

Ratios

Some recipes use ratios rather than actual weights and measures for ingredients. The way it works is that all ingredients are related to each other. One item will represent ONE part, or a single (ONE) part as defined in the recipe. All other ingredients are measured in accordance to the ONE. One could be anything from a proper measure to a wheel barrow full.

Example:

1 part of ingredient A

2 Parts of ingredient B

½ part ingredient C

If 1 part = 100 grams then it would read as follows:

100 grams ingredient A

200 grams ingredient B

50 grams ingredient C

If 1 part = a coffee cup then it would read as follows:

1 coffee cup ingredient A

2 coffee cups ingredient B

½ coffee cup ingredient C

Weights and Measures

Liquids

1/4 tsp = 1 ml
1/2 tsp = 2 ml
1 tsp = 5 ml
3 tsp = 15 ml = 1 Tbs

1 Tbs = 20 ml*

16 Tbs = 1 Cup

1 fl.oz = 28.35 ml. (30 ml)

1 jigger = 1.5 fluid ounces

1/4 cup = 60 ml = 2 fl oz = jigger
1/3 cup = 80 ml
1/2 cup = 125 ml = 4 fl oz
2/3 cup = 170 ml
3/4 cup = 190 ml

1 cup = 250 ml (226.5 ml.) = 8 fl oz

 

2 Cups = 1 pint (American)
1 quart = 1 liter (.946)

1 litre = 1000 ml

 

 

Weight

1 ounce = 30 grams
2 ounce = 60 grams
3 ounce = 90 grams
4 ounce = 125 grams
8 ounce = 225 grams
16 ounce = 500 grams

28.35 g (approx. 30 g) = 1 oz

453.6 g (approx. 450 g) = 1 lb.

1 kg = 2.2 pounds = 1000 g.

 

Misc.  Measures

1 wine glass = 1/4 cup

1 gill = 1/2 cup

1 tea cup = a scant 3/4 cup

1 coffee cup = a scant cup

1 tumbler = 1 cup

1 peck = 2 gallons - dry

1 pinch or dash = what can be picked up between the thumb        and the first two fingers; a little less than an 1/8 teaspoon

1/2 pinch = what can be picked up between the thumb and      one finger; a little less than a 1/4 teaspoon

1 salt spoon = 1/4 teaspoon

1 kitchen spoon = 1 teaspoon

1 dessert or soup spoon = 2 teaspoons

1 spoonful = 1 tablespoon

1 saucer = 1 heaping cup

1 penny weight = 1/20 ounce

1 drachma = 1/8 ounce

1 old catty = 1.33 pound = 600 grams

1 new catty = 0.5 kilo ( = 1.1 pound )

1 gill = 5 oz

Dry

1/4 tsp = 1 ml
1/2 tsp = 2 ml
1 tsp = 5 ml
3 tsp = 15 ml = 1 Tbs

1 Tbs = 20 ml*

16 Tbs = 1 Cup

1 fl.oz = 28.35 ml. (30 ml)

1/4 cup = 60 ml = 2 fl oz = jigger
1/3 cup = 80 ml
1/2 cup = 125 ml = 4 fl oz
2/3 cup = 170 ml
3/4 cup = 190 ml

1 cup = 250 ml (226.5 ml.) = 8 fl oz

1 cc = 1 ml

1 dl = 10 ml

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